10 Year Anniversary

The end of 2016 brings Corn Island Archaeology LLC to the successful completion of ten years as a local provider of cultural resources services! A huge and heartfelt “thank you” to all our clients, teaming partners, and associates as we celebrate our ten-year anniversary as a company. You have entrusted us with your interesting and locally significant projects over the years, and we hope to continue working with you all in the future. Best wishes for a prosperous and happy new year!

Clover Hill

NRHP-listed Clover Hill (JF30) is one of the earliest resources along the Dixie Highway corridor. The period of significance ranges from 1800 to 1899 with dates of significance including 1826, 1857, 1859, and 1863. AThe area of significance consists of Exploration/Settlement. Diaries kept by one owner provided abundant information, including the construction periods of the house. Additions included an octagonal room built in 1863. The property had been first owned by Robert Nicholas Miller, who served in the State Legislature in 1831 and 1848. Miller had been in the area since 1804 and first bought property at this location in 1817. The first portion of the house dates to 1826. The house was later owned by son Howard Miler, his wife Medora Griffin, and their nine children. Between 1908 and 1912, Colonel Bennett H. Young, who had served in the Confederate Army bought the property as a summer retreat. After exile to Canada and obtaining his law degree in Belfast, Young returned and made productive contributions to Louisville, including his book on prehistoric archaeology, Prehistoric Men of Kentucky.

Barnwood Builders

This Sunday, November 6, the show Barnwood Builders will feature the deconstruction of a double pen log cabin known as the Devine House, located in western Kentucky at Grand Rivers. Five years ago, Corn Island Archaeology architectural historian Anna Maas and historic architect Christopher Quirk performed detailed documentation of this historic building. Jim Pritchard, then of Brockington, oversaw the archaeology for this project.

34th KHC Archaeology Conference

The 34rd Annual Kentucky Heritage Council Archaeology Conference will be hosted in partnership with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Kentucky Archaeological Survey, Corn Island Archaeology, and the Kentucky Organization of Professional Archaeologists. The conference will take place at the Ramada Downtown North in Louisville, Kentucky.

In conjunction with this year’s conference, the Kentucky Archaeological Survey and Corn Island Archaeology have organized a special session on Native American use of the Falls of the Ohio River region. The intent is to provide an opportunity for invited researchers to present on their latest data and interpretations, and to interact with others interested in the archaeology of this geographically important area. Informal sessions will be held on Thursday and Friday (March 2nd and 3rd) and formal papers from invited speakers will open the conference on Saturday (March 4th). On Friday afternoon there will be an opportunity to examine projectile point and ceramic collections from the Falls of the Ohio River region. This will be followed by a tour of Locust Grove.

Kentucky Archaeology Month

September is Kentucky Archaeology Month! Once again, we were chosen for this year’s poster, celebrating 50 years of contributions to the National Historic Preservation Act. It can be viewed below. The Gaslight Festival will be coming up soon as well and we’ll once again have a table set up outside our office an excavating the ground around the Conrad-Seaton house, September 16th-18th. Hope to see you there!

Kentucky Archaeology Month 2016

Jefferson Jacob Schoolhouse

Corn Island’s Kathy McGrath and volunteer extraordinaire Erika Lopp conduct shovel testing at the Jefferson Jacob 1917-1950’s era African American Rosenwald school in northeastern Jefferson County prior to planned removal of a modern addition that will reveal and restore the original entrance to the building. Which has us thinking about archaeological expectations for a school play yard?

Tully Field Trip

Second graders from Tully visited Corn Island today and learned about J-town history. They learned some pottery making techniques, dug up some old artifacts from the property and got to do a bit of lab work. take a look at the gallery below. We love seeing such enthusiasm from our younger generations!
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Dr. Chris Hays Visits

Dr. Chris Hays of the University of Wisconsin visits Corn Island to examine baked clay objects from the Janzen collection of the Clarksville Site which bear remarkable similarity to items from the Poverty Point Site of Louisiana. Highly interesting!

Dr. Hays presents his findings

A few Poverty Point objects

Happy Holidays from Corn Island!

Happy Holidays from all of us here at Corn Island Archaeology to all our valued clients and friends! Here’s to another great year for everyone!

Welcome Girl Scouts!

During the Festival of the Arts last week, we were pleased to welcome this Girl Scout troop into our offices to learn about the making of Redware pottery. We had a blast, and hope they did as well!

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